Sunday, March 17, 2013

Homemade Dishwasher Detergent Cubes

It's no secret that I love making things from scratch if I can. That goes for food, cleaners, toothpaste, laundry soap.. just about anything. We were recently having a lot of trouble finding a good dishwasher detergent that got our dishes clean because nothing else was working. We actually had to wash things by hand - but then, what's the point in having a dishwasher right??

I set out to find my own way to make some and I had a few duds before coming across this one. I tweaked it a tiny bit to fit what I was looking for and this makes a great little cube for washing!
 

Ingredients:
1 Cup Borax
1 Cup Washing Soda
1/4 Cup Epsom Salt
Lemon Juice
First I started by mixing all the powders together. I made sure they get mixed up good because I wanted it evenly spread through all the cubes I'm going to be making. If you're not sure about the Borax, just eliminate that from the recipe, it won't harm it at all.
When everything was mixed I put a cup of the powder into a separate bowl and then poured in a little bit of lemon juice. For one cup of powder I used 4 tablespoons of lemon juice. You don't want it to be dry but you don't want it soaking wet either. 4 tablespoons made it a little wet and sticky which is exactly what I wanted.

The lemon juice will foam when it hits the powder. I mixed it all in and got it a little sticky. When I was finished with that, I started to add it to the ice cube trays. I put in a little and patted it down, then when I ran out I did another cup to mix with the lemon juice.
Now when I was all done, I set the cubes up on the window sill in the kitchen so that it would get a lot of sun and therefore dry quicker. Letting it sit overnight made it nice and hard and when I woke up in the morning I was able to flip the trays over and knock the cubs out.
Ta-Da!! Works wonders in the dishwasher! Another new thing to make myself that I can add to my list.

438 comments:

  1. What could be added to disinfect? Commercial detergent has bleach. Since water temps in dishwashers might not get hot enough to kill germs, what will, without bleach? Thanks, and we use the cycle that heats water. Reassure me, please?

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    1. Vinegar in the rinse cycle will disinfect.

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    2. Tea Tree essential oil added will disinfect. Also Orange or Lemon eo.
      Thanks for this recipe. I'm going to try it!

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    3. look up the properties of the things already used here. Lemon juice, the soda, and epsom salts all have disinfectant properties. you shouldn't need to use anything else to disinfect.

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    4. ...the heat of water disinfects as well.

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    5. I usually put a small glass cup right side up & add 1-3 tbsp of vinegar & it works better than Jet Dry! So worth a try here too.

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    6. Internet fist bump. Very handy & inexpensive will try.

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    7. Internet fist bump. Very handy & inexpensive will try.

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    8. I use Theives (from Younglivings) essential oil. It is a antibiotic and a disinfectant...

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    9. If your dishes are clean, you don't need a disinfectant. Bacteria can only live/grow where there's moisture and food for it.

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    10. If your dishes are clean, you don't need a disinfectant. Bacteria can only live/grow where there's moisture and food for it.

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    11. It doesn't seem necessary since the ingredients plus hot water are disinfecting but you could add grapefruit seed extract if youwanted, just ten dops or so as you make the dishwashing cubes.

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    12. Borax is a wonderful disinfectant... also leaves flatware and glasses spotless! Vinegar in the rinse is great too especially if you have hard water.

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    13. If you let the heater dry the dishes, it will get hot enough oin there to kill any bacteria. The heating element gets red hot

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    14. I just add a splash of Clorox before I start the wash. It goes all over the dishes and makes my home smell like I've been cleaning all day..lol!

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    15. ummm..... Borax is a natural bleachiing agent

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    16. Does this also take care of this milky film that occurs after dishwashing several times?

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    17. Some of the name brand dish detergents are now using enzymes instead of bleach and guess what. My tea cup and or coffee cups do not get clean. Check the bottles. I would rather try this recipe that to continue using a commercial one.

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    18. And how much would you say u get from this is it cheaper than buying dish washing liquid at Walmart for a little over two bucks over all

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    19. The "milky film" typically comes from using a liquid or gel detergent. Most are clay based and leave a film that can't be washed away with a simple detergent. Although, this detergent may take care of it, because of the lemon juice. Otherwise, run the dishwasher with vinegar or anything with a high concentration of citric acid. Should take care of the problem in 1-2 washes. Good luck!

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    20. Lemon juice is a natural disinfectant. Chefs use it to clean cutting boards.

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    21. Not sure which state you are from. The state I am in that's legal. As a chef in a public serving cafe or restaurant you must use a bleach solution.

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    22. I too am a chef and lemon helps clean but it is not a means of cleaning the boards by no means. A hot water with a proper bleaching solution is what "chef's" use.

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    23. Put vinegar in the spot you would normally use "jet dry" or similar product... cutting boards should be hand washed and disinfected not in the dishwasher....

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    24. If your dishes get "milky" then you are probably washing aluminum pans with your glassware. Wash aluminum with plastics if you have to do those in the dishwasher. It isn't your detergent that is causing the "milky film". It is the aluminum.

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  2. How do you store your cubes?
    I should think since lemon is antibacterial
    this would be enough to disinfect...along
    with the epsom salt.

    Great Recipe and Thank You!

    I'm new to your blog and just love it! :)

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    Replies
    1. We store them in a tin container that we had bought another detergent in. Works great!!

      I'm glad you joined us!!! :D

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    2. I am definitely going to give this a try. Thanks for the information.

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  3. I'm happy to see this post. I've been looking for something like this for a while.

    I like to add Melaleuca (tea tree), thieves, and/or purification as disinfectant to my laundry and dish soap. If you're interested, you can order them here: http://www.prosperinginallthings.com/#/new-medicine-cabinet/4569170976

    Louise, do you have any feedback on the cubes for anyone using them in really hard water environments? We have a horrible problem out here with scaly white buildup (I think it was b/c of the elimination of phosphates in many of the dishwashing soaps). Would love to hear feedback from others on that.

    Thanks again for the recipe!

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    1. Thank you!! I'll check out your link!

      We actually have VERY hard water here. That's one of the many things we've had to deal with. For us, this is working out great. I haven't had any of that white buildup like I would with commercial detergents.

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    2. For those with hard water, add in a 1/2 cup of Calgon or Calgonite (depending where you live) water softener to the enitial dry mix ;)

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    3. add a few glugs of vinegar before you turn your dishwasher on and it works wonders!

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    4. Borax and washing soda both work to soften water

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    5. You can buy a product called Lemishine. It is GREAT to deal with hard water issues.

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    6. I think lemishine is basically citric acid. I have hard water and use citric acid, borax, and washing soda with some vinegar in a small bowl on top shelf and it works wonders!

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    7. the borax will stop the calcification build up. use it in my dishwasher for spot free glasses, dishes, pots, utensils, yep does a might fine job and I have very hard water

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    8. I tried Lemishine detergent and rinse aid, and while it worked to get the dishes clean, it also ate the silk screened images off some of our glasses. It made me nervous to use it anymore, so I stopped before I ruined anything else. At the time I could still find some detergent with phosphates, so I used that. Last time I was shopping all my normal detergents were now "phosphate free", so I'm going to try this.

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    9. Borax itself is a disinfectant!

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  4. That's awesome! I can't wait to try it.

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  5. Where do you put the cubes in the dishwasher? I just have a little covered compartment for powder or gel. A cube wouldn't fit in there. Also, if you put it the open area of the dishwasher at the beginning of the cycle, it would all be used in the prewash and be gone for the main wash, wouldn't it?

    How would it work kept as a paste? Then it could be spooned into the compartment. Would it lose its powers kept wet like that?

    Thanks! :)

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    1. I put the cube in the bottom of the dishwasher. These are as hard as a rock when dried so it takes a long time to use it. Our goes through both washes just fine and even takes out some of the hard water stains that we've gotten over the years with commercial stuff so I know it's working.

      I have no idea how it would work as a paste - when left in the ice cube trays, it dries on it's own. Like I said, it's as hard as a rock, lol.

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    2. Thanks for your quick reply! If it lasts through both washes that's perfect. Except it just occurred to me, does it last through the rinse too? Then it would be coating the clean dishes, wouldn't it? Thanks again.

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    3. I'm not 100% sure how far it gets since I've never really checked, but our dishes come out spotless and clean. It really works no different than the ones you buy in the store.

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    4. I would think you could grind the cubes up again to make them smaller chunks... that might help keep it in the compartment if you still want to use the compartment... or pack less into each tray, to make the cubes more flat? That would be my best guess... Also, mint works for disinfection and freshness too...

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    5. Or buy the little ice cube trays and just use two.

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    6. Or spread thinly across a cookie sheet and break into small pieces which could be used as is or be put into a blender for a few seconds.

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    7. Or maybe mix the dry ingredients and keep and use it as powder. Maybe add citric acid instead of the lemon juice then.

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    8. Or you could just fill the trays half full and that would make thinner disks that would fit in the soap door... thanks for the recipe! Can't wait to try it!!

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  6. Wow! This is cool. I've had a really hard time with getting our dishes clean since our move to the country. I think we might have hard water and I've never had to deal with that. Do you know if your water is hard? I'm wondering if this would work for us. Dishwashing detergent is so expensive.

    ~Jenny

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    1. Yeah, we definitely have very hard water out here :)

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    2. The easiest way to tell if you have hard water is to see how much soap ( shampoo etc) you are using; the softer the water the less you have to use to get the suds.

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  7. Wow! Thank you. I'll have to give this a try.

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  8. How do we get your blog. Thanks, janet

    ReplyDelete
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    1. You can sign up to receive our blog in your email. The option is on the left sidebar :)

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  9. Do you know a cost break-down? :)

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    1. Not exactly no, but for the little bit we made here, it was well under $5.00

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    2. Is this safe for a dishwasher that has a stainless steel tub?

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  10. Wow! I am so happy to come across this recipe! I am going to definitely be trying it out.
    We have 11 children and a very busy dishwasher. ;) Our dishes have a hard time getting clean even though we rinse them as well.
    Thanks again!

    Blessings,
    Janet...mamachildress

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  11. Where do you get washing soda?

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    1. In the same aisle as the laundry soap and such :)

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    2. You can get the washing soda at Wal-Mart, or most grocery stores. I also make my own! It is basically Baking Soda that is baked in the over at 400 degrees to dry it out!

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    3. You can make washing soda by putting regular sodai in a pan and baking it.I found the temp and time on pintrest.Sorry I can not recall.

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    4. http://naturesnurtureblog.com/2012/05/08/ttt-turn-baking-soda-into-washing-soda/

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    5. Instead of baking, you can also heat it in a pan on the stove top. In my experience, it's quicker to do it that way. You know it's done when no more carbon dioxide bubbles out.

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  12. Great idea!! I just made laundry detergent and now am going to try this!! I love all the helpful and useful information!!

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  13. If your dishwasher has two soap cups, do you still just use one cube since you said it lasts through both the washes?

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    1. You can always try one and then two and see which works best for you.

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  14. Where's the "Print this" button? That would sure help- minus the pics. :)

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    1. I added a print button at the bottom of the post. You can click to remove the pictures for it too!

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  15. AWESOME Thanks! I have been making my own dishwashing powder with washing soda, borax & salt for a while now. Every time I tried to add citric acid (powder) to the mix, it would make the whole blend turn hard in the jar. I'd have to scrape some out every time to use. But the citric acid makes everything work better! I'm so glad for this recipe using lemon juice! One question: you said "if you're not sure about the borax, leave it out" what does that mean? Not sure about what?

    thanks again :-)

    Jenn from Oregon

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    1. Borax is a strong cleaner and not everyone is comfortable using it. However, you add so little to each cube that the water will definitely wash it all away.

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    2. Borax is all natural and it also helps soften hard water. So if you have hard well water you probably want to make sure to leave it in.

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  16. at the risk of showing my ignorance, what is washing soda?

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    1. I found this online to help explain it a little, same thing goes for dishes as it does clothes: "In laundry, washing soda accomplishes several things. The high alkalinity of washing soda helps it act as a solvent to remove a range of stains, and unlike bleach, washing soda does not usually stain. It is also used in detergent mixtures to treat hard water; the washing soda binds to the minerals which make water hard, allowing detergent to foam properly so that clothing will come out clean, without any residue. Sodium carbonate is also used by some textile artists, since it helps dyes adhere to fabric, resulting in deeper penetration and a longer lasting color."

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  17. Replies
    1. no! Washing soda. You can find it in the laundry aisle at your store.

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    2. No, but you can convert baking Soda to Washing Soda by baking it in the oven - I Googled "baking soda into washing soda by baking in the oven" I got these instructions and explanation.

      "Baking Soda is Sodium Bicarbonate or NaHCO3
      Washing Soda is Sodium Carbonate or Na2Co3

      If you heat the baking soda you cause a chemical reaction or in this case you essentially begin its decomposition. It would look like this: 2NaHCO3 --->Heat---> Na2CO3+H2O+CO2
      All of that means that the baking soda you heated changed into 3 new things: sodium carbonate, water and carbon dioxide. The water and carbon dioxide are gases at this temperature so they just float away or evaporate and you are left with the sodium carbonate sitting there. "

      Basically you bake it at 400F for around an hour to convert it.

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    3. Is it cheaper to buy washing soda? or make it out of baking soda?

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  18. do i have to copy and paste to print?

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    1. I have added a print button at the bottom of the post :)

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  19. you can also add On Guard from doTerra Oils. It does kill MERSA.

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    1. It is often pronounced 'Mersa', the acronym is MRSA. Spelled out is Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

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  20. Love this! Reblogged and Shared!!

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  21. Super excited to try this! I have had absolutely no luck with making my own dishwasher detergent before. Can't wait to try this! Thank you so much!

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  22. Sharing on the Common Sense Homesteading FB page and pinning. Nice post!

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  23. Aren't the cubes too big to close the little detergent door?

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    1. Yes - she actually commented earlier that she tosses them in the bottom of the dishwasher instead.

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  24. Just what I was looking for!
    thank you so much!

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  25. I love this idea! I've been toying with making my own and you have given me just the kick in the pants I needed!

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  26. Love it. Do you have a recipe for the laundry cubes (packages)? I am wondering if this would work in the clothes washer too?

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  27. Would white vinegar work better than lemon juice?

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  28. I need to find a recipe that is liquid for our septic the powder just ends up a large clump in the septic

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  29. I love these!!! Thanks!!! From Colleen....

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  30. Has anyone broken down the cost of making this? I understand the price of items will change from area to area and time to time, but I am curious for a ball park number per a specific number of cubes??

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    1. Much cheaper than the store bought ones.. a box of borax is around $4 or $5, and there is a lot in it.
      Washing Soda and epsom salts are around $3 each, and a bottle of lemon juice is about $2 or $3. that is enough to make a LOT of cubes for around $15, many times more than you would get if you bought the ones from the store.
      (i make my own laundry soap and dishwasher soap and we are a family of four, I am still on the same box of borax, washing soda, and epsom salts that I bought about 6 months ago)

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    2. Thank you very much for the cost info. I greatly appreciate it.

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  31. Found the site on how to turn baking soda into washing soda:

    http://naturesnurtureblog.com/2012/05/08/ttt-turn-baking-soda-into-washing-soda/

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  32. I have been looking for recipes for this and the washing machine. How much lemon juice do you use?

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  33. Is this safe for dishwashers with a stainless steel tub? I've been told vinegar would cause rust not sure if any of these ingredients would.

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    1. I use vinegar to remove those whitish mineral stains, especially from stainless steel and glass (where you can really see them). I've been using white vinegar in the rinse aid compartment of my dishwasher for over a year. My dishwasher is stainless steel, and those stains don't build up as fast as when I used Jet Dry. Stainless steel isn't supposed to rust, however, poorer quality ones can and do.

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    2. True stainless should never rust - if it does, you didn't buy a pure stainless steel tub! Try to put a magnet to it - if the magnet sticks, it's not pure stainless steel...it has iron in it and iron causes rust.

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  34. Tossing one in the bottom of the dishwasher and having some leftover after the final rinse cannot be healthy! That leaves a film of washing soda (a caustic) and Borax (a salt form of Boric acid - another caustic) on the dishes.

    Pack less into each compartment for a one-use cube.

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    Replies
    1. We have never had any leftover after using this. We didn't copy this blog - we actually made this so we know how it works before we offer it to our readers. Nothing is left on this dishes, this is the best cleaner we've come across with our hard water :)

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  35. A great idea! I was wondering could you use something similiar or even the same mix for the laundry?

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  36. For those wondering about disinfectant since commercial brands have bleach in them....You CAN buy powdered bleach that could probably be added, but I would just use vinegar in the rinse cycle

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  37. Would love to try these. Just wondering if you've noticed any discoloration in any stainless steel from them?

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  38. I am thinking maybe you could grate a cube for the small container in the dishwasher and throw the rest of the cube into the bottom of the washer!

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  39. I don't have ice cube trays any more. I was thinking I would use a mini cookie scoop and flatten it a bit to make something the right size. And just put them all on a cookie sheet to dry. This looks really neat and I am going to try it!

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    Replies
    1. Sounds great, why not! :) The shape doesn't matter at all so make it what works for you.

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  40. I think you have really hit on something here! I HATE to buy dishwashing soap, so now I don't have to. This is a great way to use up the lemon juice from the lemons from my sister in FL. Glad to have found you via Common Sense Homesteading. Its good to see women working together for the good of all. Blessings to you and your. (PS so looking forward to your blogs.)

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  41. How much is in each ice tray? Since ice trays seem to be a few different sizes, I was wondering if you used approximately 2 tablespoons or more or less?

    Thanks!

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  42. Is this safe for all dishwasher types? My dishwasher is stainless steel on the inside.

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  43. Does anyone know if this is safe for septic systems?

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    1. Louise, according to this site Borax is not-biodegradable which generally means no septic system.
      " A biodegradable surfactant is generally an organic compound. Borax is a common name for sodium borate which is an inorganic compound which is not biodegradable."

      May I suggest anyone with a septic should phone their local land commission and ask about specific material? My understanding is that what the ground is made of (clay, rock, etc) may cause variations is allowances for septic systems.

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    2. I just checked out Borax website and it states it is safe for septic systems. The sites says you can safely add a 1/2 cup per load. I have been using it in my homemade laundry detergent for over a year with no problems so far.

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  44. If you have hard water and you want to use something extra, Lemi Shine is fantastic. I found it at Wal-Mart.

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  45. Practically anything is safe on stainless steel!

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  46. Do you simply put the cube in the bottom on the dishwasher. A cube like that won't fit in my detergent dispenser. Stonemaven: I'm on a septic system and these ingredients won't hurt it. In fact, the no-suds factor makes it even better for septic systems than store-bought brands. Thanks for sharing this recipe. I'll repost to my blog.

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    1. Yes, I just toss it on the bottom of the dishwasher.

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    2. LOL, no one reads the posts... they just post the same questions over and over.

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  47. Does this remove the need to buy that costly blue rinse agent?

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    1. I use white vinegar in my rinse-aid cup instead of jet dry. WAY more cost effective and works great!

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  48. Awesome! I'm all fired up to get all the ingredients and make some of this stuff. I don't have an ice cube tray either, but I'm sure the dollar store has one-might be simpler than using the scoop I would think. :)

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  49. Please help me understand the purpose of the lemon juice. Why not just use the powder mixture as you would a store bought powder detergent and put the lemon juice or vinegar in the rinse compartment?

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    Replies
    1. Citric acid in the lemon juice helps to clean the dishes and prevent build up.

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  50. Borax is banned in Europe, you can get equivalent but not so good.We get this rubbish all the time here, not long ago EU government wanted to ban the sale of rat poison ,,,,,wait for it.,,,,,,,,,because it is poisonous. Strewth

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    Replies
    1. Stupidity is all over the world. Here in America they recall sweatshirts with hoods on them if they draw strings because of fear that someone will get hung by a bus door closing on it, or whatever. I think normally intelligent people will survive the drawstring danger. :o\

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  51. ^^^ as opposed to the bleach and other chemicals that people use from ready-made cleaners? I'd take my chances with something that I made myself before I trust companies to provide a long list of harmful "fillers" in my products... but that's just my opinion...

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  52. I saw one other post like this recently but I dont think they used the epsom salt. I can't wait to try this! I was just cutting coupons for the name brand stuff and thinking about how much money goes into dw detergent during the year. Great post!

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  53. Our well water is soft and rinsing soap off is difficult, anyone have knowledge of an ingredient that will shed off the soap?

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    Replies
    1. when you have soft water you have to use a lot less soap, that includes in the washing machine.The phrase "a little dab will do you" works well in the shower.

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  54. I was so excited to try this recipe out!! I made my first batch last night and used it this morning. It left a white film on some of the dishes. Is there a way to remedy that? I thought I would ask here first before trying it on my own.

    Many Thanks

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    Replies
    1. Try increasing the citric acid component, either adding extra lemon juice or adding some powdered citric acid.

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  55. Is baking soda the same as washing soda. The box looks the same.




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    1. No, they are different and can not be used interchangeably.

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    2. No, baking soda is different than washing soda. However, if you bake baking soda in the oven at 400 degrees, you will have washing soda.

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  56. So, you just buy and pay for four ingredients separately, pay tax on each of them separately instead of buying one item. Makes sense to me!

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    1. hey Dumbass (yes I'm talking to you Regina Carey) Do you even know how much these little soap bars cost? They are very expensive! Yes you do have to buy 4 different items, but if you did the math, you'd find that your saving money in the long run by making it yourself. But an idiot like you probably works for one of those soap manufacturing companies and have never lifted a finger to help your wife do the dishes. So instead of making a negative comment about a great recipe that works better than the crap they sell in the stores, shut the hell up and continue to sit in your easy chair and continue to kill yourself with that fat cigar you've been smoking! DUMBASS!

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    2. I bought (1) box of washing soda and (1) box of borax 11 months ago. I've used them for laundry detergent and dish detergent ever since... and still have plenty of both boxes left. What 1 item could I have bought that would have served my family's laundry detergent and dish washer detergent needs for a year... with plenty of product to spare at the 1 year mark?

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    3. Sandy, I was getting ready to post the same thing :0)

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  57. Those four ingredients will make far more finished product than the one pre-made product. Far cheaper, better for environment and works better for people with hard water.

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  58. lemon juice and borax and the VERY hot water in the dishwasher are enough to disinfect...chlorine bleach is a TOXIN and indicated in many diseased including breast cancer... no one should use it and it is not necessary- not to mention ANY anit-bacterial cleaning products which are causing water pollution- cancers and the development of super bacterias which are anti-biotic resistant..they should be illegal...

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  59. Replies
    1. Altered baking soda, found in the laundry detergent aisle. Or you can bake the baking soda (there are instructions available online) causing the baking soda to convert to washing soda... but I don't know that it would be as economical.

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  60. What is "1 Cup Washing Soda"? Thanks!

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    1. Washing soda can be found in the laundry detergent aisle.

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  61. Hello from Estonia. I will try this tomorrow :D

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  62. We already make our own laundry detergent and love it! We will be trying this next.

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  63. I have a question about the size -- could you maybe use one of the smaller ice cube trays, like the ones for an RV? Do you think that would make them small enough to fit in the little compartment with the door? I am SO going to try this, we are spending nearly $12 every two weeks for the dishwasher tabs right now.

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  64. I am going to try this for sure....I add white vineger to the rinse aid compartment of my dishwasher...

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  65. I read somewhere that the lemon in commercial products was not good for your dishes, it causes etching on glass. Since then i have used "commrecial" detergents|without "lemon", ( no easy feat in finding it). I was wondering if that was really true.... BUT... I do plan on using this recipe. I already make my own washing powders.

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  66. Thanks for this recipe!! I am teaching classes at a homeless shelter for women and children who, eventually, will be out of the shelter and on their own. Money is a HUGE obstacle for these women so ANYTHING that we can teach them to do that's HEALTHY and CHEAP, I'm a HUGE fan of. This, with your permission, will be in the "recipe handbook" that I am making for each of them. THIS ROCKS!! THANKS so much for your willingness to share!!

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  67. I love your site! I am almost out of diswasher stuff, this is perfecr timing...I make my own laundry detergent. I want to see your recipe. Love, love, love this site and all of the nifty ideas. Keep up the good work! I am publishing as anonymous until I figure the others "comment as" ways to post.

    Sincerely,

    Jill Thurow
    Wisconsin

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  68. I wondered about just leaving dry and adding lemon juice to rinse aid compartment. Jill

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  69. Great info please right a book and let me know,I will buy it...

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  70. Couldn't this also be used for laundry? I may try both .... dishes and clothes. I've been making homemade household stuff for about 3-4 yrs. This is another great idea to try.

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  71. I just citric acid to make DIY dishwasher powder, but I think this idea...can I use citic acid in place of the Borax

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  72. For a while now, I've been making / using a DIY dishwasher detergent with the same ingredients...but I love the convenient cube idea! In regards to the hard water issue...yes, washing soda does a good job but white vinegar as a rinsing agent also does wonders for the build up in the dishwasher's pipes and hoses.

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  73. Can't wait to try....thanks for sharing! ~~ One Blessed Chicky

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  74. I have been using this minus the epsom salt for about a year and a half, our water is really hard, and this works like a charm. In paste form it is also great for cleaning lime scale and rust from your shower.

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    1. Oh, I like that idea for the shower!

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  75. Quick question, I know there is a LOT of controversy with Borax right now....wondering if subbing Baking Soda for the Borax would still be effective? Just curious.

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  76. My stainless specifies not to use "lemon" dish washing detergent as it tarnishes. They were right. What else can be used as a proper liquid to the solids listed?

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    1. Stainless steel is not suppose to tarnish...thus the name stainless. If you are talking about chef's knives...they are usually mixed steel and you need to hand wash those anyway to prevent reactions. Sucks, huh?

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  77. Could this be used as a laundry soap too? Like the pods that go right in the drum.

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  78. I have never heard of washing soda, is that Arm and Hammer laundry detergent?

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    1. Arm and Hammer makes Washing Soda, but it is different from their Laundry Detergent.

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    2. With A& H it is called super washingn soda. Here is their link as to where to find it in the USA, just put in your zip code:

      http://www.armandhammer.com/Products/WhereToBuy.aspx

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  79. I wish people were required to put a name down, then maybe it would not be so easy for "Anonymous" to use words llike Dumbass w hen referring to another person in a reply. May I suggest the name troll for that particular posters name?

    Louise, thank you for the recipe. I have one question. You said this gets rock hard, it lasts a long time and you sit it in the bottom of your dish washer. My concern is that residue would remain. How do you prevent that?

    May I post the recipe to my soap list with a link to your page for full directions?

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  80. I'm going to try making a version using Lemishine added to the dry ingredients, and just use water to moisten rather than the lemon juice. I use it now to make all my dishes come out streak free and it also wipes out all the hard water deposits that plague us here on our well.

    Great idea - THANKS!

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  81. Looking forward to trying this!!!

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  82. I have a question about the borax. How safe is it for new dishwashers? I ask because I used to use it in a bathsalt and it left a white film on my tub that i still cannot remove. So I'm wondering if it might do the same to the dishes... I already have very hard water that leaves a white film sometimes...

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  83. This sound very interesting! I have another recipe for dish detergent that I use, but may try this in the future. Hope you don't mind, I have posted a link to your blog on my own blog. It will link it back to you. I added it below my own recipe for dish detergent. Here's my blog: http://urbanhomesteadinginmichigan.blogspot.com/2013/03/my-favorite-home-made-cleaners.html

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  84. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  85. Aren't they too big for the cup for powder detergent in the dishwasher? Do u have to cut them?

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  86. Thoughts on if this could be morphed into cubes for the clothes washer?? Great idea.

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  87. Can I use coarse kosher salt instead of Epsom salts?

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    1. Kosher salt and epsom salts are not the same thing

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  88. I so totally love this!!! I tried it this past weekend and my dishes are actually cleaner then the store bought brands!! thanks you for giving all of us a way that is simpler and actually less expensive!!! Thank you!!!

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  89. where in the store can I fine Borax?

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    1. * find not fine

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    2. I find Botax at Target in laundry detergent aisle. It's not right up front you kind have to look for it. White box. You can also find it at Home Depot in the clean supplies and/or pool supplies.

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  90. Curious if regular baking soda will work?

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    1. Regular baking soda is different than washing soda. Baking soda may work but you will not get the same outcome. I've found all the ingredients at either walmart or my local grocery store. They're not hard to find.

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  91. We put vinegar in the "jet dry" dispenser. Works great!

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  92. Curious...would this recipe work for laundry?

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  93. Hi, this is a great recipe however I have two questions. I see many have questioned how this would affect stainless steel interiors and I have not seen an answer to allay their fears (and I also have a stainless steel dishwasher). Secondly the washing soda that we get in our country is not fine but large crystals so how would I go about mixing this. Thanks so much.

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    1. You might want to put them in a food processor or something like it to make your crystals finer.

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  94. Lemon disinfects.

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  95. My dishwasher has a fine chine cycle that I use periodically -- holiday get-togethers and such -- how do you feel this would work with my fine china?

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  96. I've never seen your site before, but I love it! Am definately trying this soon.
    Keep up with homemade stuff, I'm with you, if I can make it..I will!

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  97. This is off-topic but I didn't see another way to get information to you. You may be interested in exploring with making your own yogurt starter completely from scratch. Most folks who make their own yogurt use either (a) commercial biotics powder or (b) 2 Tbls of prior batch or 2 Tbs of yogurt with active bacteria.

    This site discusses starting completely from scratch using stems of red chili peppers. Some of the comments show that others have tried it successfully.

    http://www.wildfermentation.com/yogurt-cultured-by-chili-peppers/

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